Roosevelt Collier | Artists | GroundUP Music

Roosevelt Collier

.
.
.
.
.

Roosevelt Collier Bio

“This record is a record about me,” says Roosevelt Collier. “It’s telling a story of who I am, where I’m from, and where I’m going.”

A transcendent talent on pedal and lap steel guitars — and so proficient, he’s affectionately known as “The Dr.” — Collier’s debut album Exit 16 on GroundUP Music is a potent mix of blues, gospel, rock and, in his words, “dirty funk swampy grime,” as overseen by producer and bandmate Michael League (from the Grammy-winning Snarky Puppy).

It’s also a brilliant reflection of Collier’s life. All of it. Brought up in the House of God Church in Perrine, FL, Collier built his “sacred steel” guitar prowess alongside his uncles and cousins in The Lee Boys, known for their spirited, soul-shaking live performances. On his own, Collier’s become a sought-after talent both on record and on stage, performing alongside musical luminaries in the fields of rock, blues and pop, including the Allman Brothers, The String Cheese Incident, Buddy Guy, Umphrey's McGee, Los Lobos, Robert Randolph, the Tedeschi-Trucks Band, and the Del McCoury Band, among countless others.

“Roosevelt channels something spiritual,” says League, who was instrumental in getting Collier to (finally) craft his own album after decades in the music scene.

“He’s a reason I’m talking about this now,” says Collier. “I’ve had offers to make my own music before. But when Mike came along, it just felt right.”

Exit 16 was recorded over three days of marathon sessions by League and a bevy of talented sidemen, including JT Thomas on drums and Bobby Sparks on organ. “You gotta be able to trust your bandmates, and Mike knew the right guys and knows what I’m about,” says Collier. “This could have been a star-studded thing. But that would have overshadowed what we wanted to do here.”

And what Collier wanted to do was encapsulate all of influences and experiences. “I’m rooted in a lot of genres, so I’ve never really had a focus or to buckle down,” he says, laughing. So on Exit 16 you’ll find an infectious track like “Happy Feet” sitting happily nearby “Spike,” wherein Collier shreds with the spirit of Hendrix. “I actually think a song like ‘Spike’ is about my future,” says the guitarist. “My goal there was to see how we can expand this guitar, this steel.” And, reflecting on his early days, “Sun Up Sun Down” and “Supernatural” feel like joyous, spiritual workouts.

And then there’s the title track, which Collier refers to as “dump truck funk.” Says the musician: “That’s the old do-not-enter gate type of funk — it’s dangerous! Beware of dogs out there.”

Photos by Carlos Topo Maseda and Francois Bisi.

Music

.

Exit 16 (2018)

Roosevelt's Debut Album on GroundUP Music, Exit 16 is due this March. Pre-order available now!

1 Sun Up Sun Down
2 Happy Feet
3 Make It Alright
4 Exit 16
5 That Could’ve Been Bad
6 Supernatural Encounters
7 Spike

More Artists

Sirintip

Stretching across three continents and cultures (Thailand, Sweden and America), Sirintip’s remarkable debut album Tribus — produced by three-time Grammy winner Michael League of Snarky Puppy — is a gathering of different moments from the last four years of the sin...

Bokanté

The word bokanté means “exchange” in Creole, the language of vocalist Malika Tirolien’s youth growing up on the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. For the newly-formed “World Music Supergroup” (Pulse) Bokanté, connection is the foundation upon which al...

Cory Henry

Cory Henry is a multi-instrumentalist and producer with a catalog worthy of a man twice his age. His primary instrument is the organ, and he began playing at the age of two. At the age of six he competed at the Apollo Theater and made it to the finalist round.

Follow @GroundUPMusicNYC